TRAINING IN ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN FRUITS & VEGETABLES DRYING AND PROCESSING

TRAINING!!! TRAINING!! TRAINING!
Are you fruit and vegetable growers?TRAINING!!! TRAINING!! TRAINING!
Are you fruit and vegetable growers?
Are you a farmers and want to learn how to increase income by add value to your produces?
Are you looking for newer opportunities in Drying and Processing fruits and vegetables?
Then we have solutions to increasing your income…..

Darsfoundation would be training Fruits & Vegetables Processors in Ho of the Volta Region to reduce waste and post harvest losses.
Do you want to know the Advanced Drying and Processing Technology of Fruits & Vegetables?
Do you want to know how to-
• GMP, GAP and Quality Assurance in food processing
• Sorting of Fruits and Vegetable
• Drying of selected fruits and vegetables
• Packaging and reprocessing
• Processing, Packaging and marketing
• Designing and fabrication of Solar Dryers

You can’t miss this training for anything;
Join us to diversify post-harvest processes and management of fruits and vegetables for food security.

Venue: Chances Hotel, Ho. Volta Region. Ghana
Time: 8.30AM- 4.30PM (Daily)
Date: May 1, 2017

Call Kwashie or email now to register your interest.
Call: 0208613398, 0262613398
Email: dvfarms1970@yahoo.co.uk/ darsfoundationgh@gmail.com

Are you a farmers and want to learn how to increase income by add value to your produces?
Are you looking for newer opportunities in Drying and Processing fruits and vegetables?
Then we have solutions to increasing your income…..

Darsfoundation would be training Fruits & Vegetables Processors in Ho of the Volta Region to reduce waste and post harvest losses.
Do you want to know the Advanced Drying and Processing Technology of Fruits & Vegetables?
Do you want to know how to-
• GMP, GAP and Quality Assurance in food processing
• Sorting of Fruits and Vegetable
• Drying of selected fruits and vegetables
• Packaging and reprocessing
• Processing, Packaging and marketing
• Designing and fabrication of Solar Dryers

You can’t miss this training for anything;
Join us to diversify post-harvest processes and management of fruits and vegetables for food security.

Venue: Chances Hotel, Ho. Volta Region. Ghana
Time: 8.30AM- 4.30PM (Daily)
Date: May 1, 2017

Call Kwashie or email now to register your interest.
Call: 0208613398, 0262613398
Email: dvfarms1970@yahoo.co.uk/ darsfoundationgh@gmail.com

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THE CHALLENGE OF FAILED AGRICULTURAL POLICIES IN GHANA

 

Agriculture and agribusiness remains the only sector of our economy that can generate massive wealth and jobs for Ghana. Why? The sector of agriculture has been under-developed and under tapped to the benefit of the state. Some few years ago for instance, Ghana’s vegetables were banned and as we speak Ghana’s fruit is also facing greater challenges that would soon lead to international rejects especially in Europe and America. Ghana’s fruit and vegetable sector engages nearly 100,000 farmers directly and indirectly.

 

In Ghana, agriculture employs over 65- 80% of citizens in both urban and rural areas. This sector is the least supported in terms of subsidies, capacity building, project financing, infrastructures and markets development. Our agricultural sectors are dreadfully challenged by exemplary leadership, innovative technologies and human resources. But, in the lives of Ghana’s economy, agriculture remains the main stay of the economy and it would remain so for a long time to come. Without access to predictable markets for their crops, small-scale farmers in mostly rural communities are often forced to accept lower prices for their crops and find themselves trapped in a cycle of poverty. While the global credit supply for smallholders has grown in recent years, it is geographically skewed with less than 10 percent of financial flows reaching sub-Saharan Africa.

 

I recall in 2014 state of the Nation’s address, President Mahama stated that over $1.5 billion was spent on importing some eight food commodities into the country to beef up the national food security, and that range from cooking oil, rice, poultry, sugar, vegetables, fish etc. To many of us, this could be produced in Ghana of which Ghana has good arable farmland and climate to even do better than most countries in the tropics, if issues of agricultural financing and leadership challenges are resolved and dealt with by the state. In a nutshell, how can we have our mouths in someone else’s kitchen?

 

According to UN reports, between 1980 and 2000, global population rose from 4.4 billion to 6.1 billion, while food production increased by 50 percent. By 2050, the population is expected to hit over nine billion. Experts say agricultural production needs to increase by at least 60 percent over the next 40 years to meet the rising demand for food. The causes of all these problems are the unsustain exploitation of the earth’s resources, triggered by growing affluence in some parts of the world coupled to desperate poverty in other continents, linked to rapidly increasing population. The Millennium Development Goals will not be met through continuous reliance of 70% of Africa’s population on subsistence agriculture. On paper, Africa could be transformed from food deficit continent to one of the world’s major exporters of agricultural produce.

The millennium development goals will not be met through continuous reliance of 70% of Africa’s population on subsistence agriculture. On paper, Africa could be transformed from food deficit continent to one of the world’s major exporters of agricultural produce.

 

A lot is on Africa to lead the world in achieving food sufficiency, given its relatively huge uncultivated land resources and untapped potentials in agriculture, and unattained potential productivity gains as a main source of future supply and stability for food and industrial agricultural markets. Had we implemented good policies and deplored good structures to man the projects we would have performed better than most nations, so why import what can be produced here in large quantities and even export to other countries? Could it be leadership challenge? Could it be challenge for innovative technology and research? Could it be information and human resources challenge? Could it be challenge for monitoring and evaluation? And could it be political will or the general notion that agriculture is risky? Yet in the United States of America (USA), the USA government through USDA subsidies agriculture to a tune of $1billion per day, to support the local actors to develop local infrastructures and develop markets in other regions of the world. Secondly the government of USA and Europe has supported their farmers to produce and market their produce. The US government through the World Food Programs, use WFP to market the excess produce to regions or areas of scarcity.

 

So, what are the current policies to support and protect the existing agribusiness? What are the current policies to support and establish start-up agribusiness? What are the policies to engage more women and youths in agriculture for revival of the sector? What policy has been put in place to fund business of agriculture? Any policy for the government to support agro- marketers to establish Ghana’s markets in other countries as the Nigerian’s has done? Ghana has good agricultural policies and regulations, yet the horticultural sectors are faced with massive global rejection of our fruits and vegetables on the European and US markets with crippling embargo that would destroy the livelihood and income of over 100,000 non state-actors that are directly involved in here. And if Ghana keeps importing farm produce, then foreign farmers are directly competing with local farmers in ways that put our local farmers and food security at risk.

 

For every one dollar spent on imported food commodities creates a job for one foreign farmer abroad but deny our farmers the opportunities to establish. A huge proportion of our local production and markets has been captured by importations and it’s gradually taking over the local economy. In Nigeria for instance, importation of tropical crops has been banned and local farmers empowered to produce and substitute for domestic demand

 

As government is unwilling to implement good agricultural policies that would regulate the sectors, many sections of agriculture remains threatened for lack of supervision, remuneration and motivation. The local seed companies and seeds banks are collapsing if not collapsed, many of the agricultural sector lacks financial players to support start-ups and revamp the sector by engaging the youths and women to partake in it, mining industries remains a major threat to agriculture as farmlands are destroyed for mining and never restored, waterbodies polluted with heavy metals and toxic compounds. State departments refusal to partner local farmers leading to refusal to help farmers develop markets in other regional economies with expanded value chains integrations in agriculture.

 

Ghana’s farmers must look away from conventional farming to organic farming, to stand out as Africa food hub (food baskets). In conventional plant breeding or farming very little attention has been paid to the possible negative impacts of new plant varieties on food safety or the environment. However, this kind of farming has caused negative effects on human health. For instance, a cultivated crop variety created by conventional cross breeding can contain excessive levels of naturally occurring toxins. The introduction of genetically modified plants has raised some concerns that gene transfer could occur in the field between cultivated and wild plants and such concerns also apply to conventional crops. Such transfers have occasionally been reported but are generally not considered a problem.

 

GMO and conventional foods are so genetically manipulated and they cannot grow well and output high without high doses of weedicide, pesticide, insecticide and fertilizers. Crops grown with high toxic and poisonous chemicals, usually contains high levels of toxic residual chemicals which affects man after consuming them. Today, we have more diseases on our hands than we can handle from consuming conventional food with high level of toxin and toxic compounds in them and from heavy usage of agricultural chemicals. We will tell you some of the diseases and illnesses that has of recent increased with conventional farming & GMO came into our food system 1) Autism 2) Diabetic 3) Hypertension/ High blood pressure 4) Fibroid 5) Child abnormalities/ babies born with congenital defects 6) Infertility/ sterilization in male and female 7) Anemia 8) Food allergies 9) Skin diseases 10) Tumour of all kinds in all body parts 11) Hydrocephalus 12) Erectile dysfunctioning and loss of sperm volume count 13) Reduce enzymes reactions leading to accumulation of toxin in our body 14) Imbalance hormonal production 15) Physical impairment 16) Wasting diseases 17) Hole- In- Heart among new born or children 18) Hunger among our population, today over 2.8 billion risk hunger in the world.

 

Other problems of conventional farming and GMO technologies in our environment and other species of lives are- 1) Destruction of our fertile land and increase barren lands. 2) Killed earthworms, termites, mushroom snail in our soil. 3) Killed bees and butterflies that pollinate our crop. 4) Polluted our water bodies, killing our fishes and poisoning water for safe drinking. 5) Increases global warming and climate change due to poor sequestration of soil carbon. 6) Increase environmental and natural disasters. These are some of the many few consequences of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) and conventional agriculture.

 

Due to failed policy implementation by various state parastatals and agencies more jobs and wealth cannot be created. Students graduates from various universities only to remain unemployed. Can you imagine what $1B can do to the agricultural sector in Ghana? First, if state actors were busily working we would have developed lots of arable lands to irrigated farmlands and developed more dams, large pasture and rangelands would have been developed to manage livestock industries across Ghana. Secondly, if we were really producing food the engineers would be busily constructing storage facilities (silos) to store and factories process our produce. Third, if the Extension services were performing their duties, we would have maintained certain standards in the food production chains and processing sectors. Fourth, there are lots of waste generated each year in agriculture which could be recycled to create more employment and other products such as turning waste into compost, ethanol and gel. Fifth, more graduate students would have been involved in agricultural researches, developing better innovative technologies and products for better agricultural prosperity and performance.

 

Interaction with many rural farmers reveals a very depressing working conditions and environment as the sector is fronted with surmountable challenges facing the agriculture and horticultural industries. The challenges facing farmers and SMEs are-

  • They access to credit facility to expand, coupled to high interest rates
  • Lack of Business Development services training and capacity building
  • Lack of technological transfer, research and agricultural innovations
  • Lack of government pragmatic policies to promote and protect Small SMEs.
  • Lack of access to foreign markets and govt support to develop markets in other economy
  • Lack of agricultural insurance to make agriculture attractive for the youths and women in both rural and urban areas.
  • High cost of employing high skilled labour.
  • High cost of agricultural services and inputs.

 

The protection of indigenous seeds genome and the support of local seed companies to venture into producing and breeding of tropical seeds for national and food security. But instead the current national policies are protecting multi-national seed and agro-chemical companies competing to destroy the local seeds adaptive to our local climate and environment at the expense of the indigenous seeds. Is Ghana‘s policies not meant to protect the expansion and survivability of our agricultural systems? Then what are we doing to encourage our own?

  

We need to encourage plant breeders, more so the animal breeders, without crop breeders to breed our tropical crops and modifying the yield outputs, then our food industries is faced with imminent challenge. Our breeders are not properly resourced hence they do not breed and so farmers do not get improved varieties to grow their livelihoods. Private industries and manufacturers must support plant breeders to breed for secured food security. Without crop and animal breeders we are faced with food insecurity.

 

Lastly, the current crisis between the nomadic herdsmen and crop farmers is worth mentioning as the two units has not being properly defined with clear cut policies to develop each unit without the interference of the other. In many countries across the world land areas has been developed for livestock and crop farming what has been the position of Ghana in the last fifty years? It would be advisable to demarcate certain areas in every region for livestock industries by establishing pasturelands, range areas and ranches through livery services initiatives. As its popularly said, he who controls protein controls the world. Let’s develop our protein industries with well-defined but measurable policies.

 

We see this as a good avenue to help increase incomes and job opportunities for ten million employees of agricultural businesses, three hundred thousand smallholder farmers and over two million farm family members. If the cedi slums against major international currencies, it is because we are not producing

 

KWASHIE DARKUDZI B. Sc Animal Health (Hon) is the Operations director of Darsfield EarthCare & Farm-Tech Foundation and agriculture in environment civil society. He is a trainer of rural farmers in organic farming fruits and vegetables, sustainable agriculture such as agro-forestry, snail, mushroom, beekeeping and captive rearing of animals, aquaculture and agro-processing initiatives.

Contact. dvfarms1970@yahoo.co.uk, darsfoundationgh@gmail.com.

 

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THE AGONY OF GHANA’S AGRICULTURE

 

Increase in food production in Africa has been achieved by extended cropland, but population pressure, competition between crops and livestock for space and declining soil fertility are forcing African countries to ramp up investment in fertilizers. Secondly, food security in Ghana is threatened by the over 90% of farmers practicing slash and burn, and subsistence farming with reduced supports.

 

While some are promoting organic farming, most experts agrees to conventional farming that is chemical fertilization is necessary to a greater extent or lesser or a combination of both. Opinion differs but we all agree to produce more on the same amount of land without damaging the resources base of the land. In recent statistical figure, the world population has been estimated to reach 7.4 billion, massively depleting fish and livestock species at an alarming rate, which food production declining heavily across the globe and Ghana is no exception.

 

The concept of organic farming techniques involves the cultivation of crops and animals in recycling of farm waste. This could include the recycling of timber waste, sea waste and human waste to produce quality food crops. Organic technology allows the free interaction of earth, plants and animals including insects. However the threat to organic is biotechnology which encourages conventional and GMO practices. If the technologies we employ into agriculture are not looked at carefully, we would be looking at global hunger, mass unemployment and chronic poverty and mass war over natural resources like forests and water bodies, fertile lands and food hubs. Ghana cannot be left out of reviving her agricultural system that marries environment, other species of lives and people together.

 

Farm practices has been gradually replaced with the use of weedicide/ herbicide to control weeds, chemical fertilizer to enrich the soil and pesticide and insecticide to control pest and diseases in addition to the use of hybrid seeds to save time, labour and costs to farmers. Farmers have on their own become reluctant to allow free interaction of species of animals to species of plants that exists within our environment. If the Bible mentions that land should be use for sixth years but for the seventh year the land should be rested, then we must be missing something in the current practice in agriculture (Exodus 23:10).

 

Recently, scientists has discovered and introduced new technology into agriculture and medicine e.t.c which has been termed biotechnology. Some of this research or technology comes with dire consequences, as conventional farming has brought in high levels of chemical toxicity, heavy metals, salt and minerals in our food supplies coupled to unimaginable consequences of GM food to species of animals that consumes it.

 

Biotechnology refers to any technique that uses living organisms, or parts of these organisms. Such techniques are used to make or modify products for a practical purpose. Modern medicine, agriculture, and industry make use of biotechnology on a large scale. Agriculture of any type has an impact on the environment, on the food production and on the consumers. Genetic engineering may accelerate the damaging effects of agriculture, so also is the same impact as conventional agriculture and contribute to more unsustainable practices.

 

Growing genetically modified or conventional plants in the field has raised concern for the potential transfer of genes from cultivated species to their wild relatives. However, many food plants are not native to the areas in which they are grown. Locally, they may have no wild relatives to which genes could flow. Moreover, if gene flow occurs, it is unlikely that the hybrid plants would thrive in the wild, because they would have characteristics that are advantageous in agricultural environments only.

 

A controversy has arisen about whether certain genetically modified plants (which are insect resistant because they carry the Bt gene) could harm not only insect pests but also other species such as the monarch butterfly. In the field, no significant adverse effects on non-target species have so far been observed. Nonetheless, continued monitoring for such effects is needed.

 

Genetically modified crops may have indirect environmental effects as a result of changing agricultural or environmental practices. However, it remains controversial whether the net effect of these changes will be positive or negative for the environment. For example, the use of genetically modified insect-resistant Bt crops is reducing the volume and frequency of insecticide use on maize, cotton and soybean. Yet the extensive use of herbicide and insect resistant crops could result in the emergence of resistant weeds and insects

 

It is extremely unlikely that genes may transfer from plants to disease-causing bacteria through the food chain. Nevertheless, scientists advise that genes which determine resistance to antibiotics that are critical for treating humans should not be used in genetically modified plants. Some genetically modified crops have been engineered to include genetic material from BT (Bacillus thuringiensis), a natural bacterium found in soil. Inserting the Bt genes makes the plant itself produce bacterial toxins, thereby killing the insects that could destroy it. The first GM crop carrying Bt genes, potatoes, were approved in the United States in 1995. Today there are Bt versions of corn, potatoes and cotton. Roundup on crop such as soybeans, corn, canola, sugar beets, cotton and alfalfa have been manipulated to be resistant to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s broadleaf weed killer Roundup.

 

In agriculture the two non-organic traits are herbicide resistance and pesticide production which are now pervasive in America agriculture and in particular Ghana’s agriculture. The Ministry of Food and Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service says that, in 2010, as much as eighty six (86) percent of corn, up to ninety (90) percent of all soybeans and nearly ninety three (93) percent of cotton were GM varieties.

 

Ten Reasons to refuse Conventional farming & GMO

Lately, it has been recorded at various health centers and environmentalists are reporting on the increase clinical health and allergy to degrading environmental conditions respectively. On health and environmental issues these are some of the undermentioned situations we have on hand and to deal with as employs GMO and conventional farming technics-

 

Conventional farming and GMO on human health

Diseases and illnesses that has of recent increased with conventional farming & GMO came into our food system-

  • Autism
  • Diabetic
  • Hypertension/ High blood pressure
  • Fibroid
  • Child abnormalities/ babies born with congenital defects
  • Infertility/ sterilization in male and female
  • Anemia
  • Food allergies
  • Skin disease
  • Tumour of all kinds in all body parts
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Erectile dysfunctioning and loss of sperm volume count
  • Reduce enzymes reactions leading to accumulation of toxin in our body
  • Imbalance hormonal production
  • Physical impairment
  • Wasting diseases
  • Hole- In- Heart among new born or children
  • Hunger among our population, today over 2.8 billion risk hunger in the world.

 

Harms to our environment and other species of animals

Other problems of conventional farming and GMO technologies brings-

  • Destruction of our fertile land and increase barren lands.
  • Killed earthworms, termites, snail in our soil.
  • Killed bees that pollinate our crop.
  • Polluted our water bodies, killing our fishes and poisoning water for safe drinking.
  • Increases global warming and climate change due to poor sequestration of soil carbon.
  • Increase environmental and natural disasters.

 

GMOs are unhealthy

The American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) urges doctors to prescribe non-GMO diets for all patients. They cite animal studies showing organ damage, gastrointestinal and immune system disorders, accelerated aging, and infertility. Human studies show how genetically modified (GM) food can leave material behind inside us, possibly causing long-term problems. Genes inserted into GM soy, for example, can transfer into the DNA of bacteria living inside us, and that the toxic insecticide produced by GM corn was found in the blood of pregnant women and their unborn fetuses.

 

Numerous health problems increased after GMOs were introduced in 1996. The percentage of Americans with three or more chronic illnesses jumped from 7% to 13% in just 9 years; food allergies skyrocketed, and disorders such as autism, reproductive disorders, digestive problems, and others are on the rise. Although there is not sufficient research to confirm that GMOs are a contributing factor, doctors groups such as the AAEM tell us not to wait before we start protecting ourselves, and especially our children who are most at risk.

 

GMOs contaminate forever

GMOs cross pollinate and their seeds can travel. It is impossible to fully clean up our contaminated gene pool. Self-propagating GM pollution will outlast the effects of global warming and nuclear waste. The potential impact is huge, threatening the health of future generations. GMO contamination has also caused economic losses for organic and non-GMO farmers who often struggle to keep their crops and lands pure.

 

GMOs increase herbicide use

Most GM crops are engineered to be “herbicide tolerant”, they defy deadly weed killer. Monsanto, for example, sells Roundup Ready crops, designed to survive applications of their Roundup herbicide. Between 1996 and 2008, US farmers sprayed an extra 383 million pounds of herbicide on GMOs. Overuse of Roundup results in “superweeds,” resistant to the herbicide. This is causing farmers to use even more toxic herbicides every year. Not only does this create environmental harm, GM foods contain higher residues of toxic herbicides. Roundup, for example, is linked with sterility, hormone disruption, birth defects, and cancer.

 

Genetic engineering creates dangerous side effects

By mixing genes from totally unrelated species, genetic engineering unleashes a host of unpredictable side effects. Moreover, irrespective of the type of genes that are inserted, the very process of creating a GM plant can result in massive collateral damage that produces new toxins, allergens, carcinogens, and nutritional deficiencies.
Government oversight is dangerously lax

Most of the health and environmental risks of GMOs are ignored by governments’ superficial regulations and safety assessments. The reason for this tragedy is largely political. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for example, doesn’t require a single safety study, does not mandate labeling of GMOs, and allows companies to put their GM foods onto the market without even notifying the agency. Their justification was the claim that they had no information showing that GM foods were substantially different. But this was a lie. Secret agency memos made public by a lawsuit show that the overwhelming consensus even among the FDA’s own scientists was that GMOs can create unpredictable, hard-to-detect side effects. They urged long-term safety studies. But the White House had instructed the FDA to promote biotechnology, and the agency official in charge of policy was Michael Taylor, Monsanto’s former attorney, later their vice president.


The biotech industry uses “tobacco science” to claim product safety

Biotech companies like Monsanto told us that Agent Orange, PCBs, and DDT were safe. They are now using the same type of superficial, rigged research to try and convince us that GMOs are safe. Independent scientists, however, have caught the spin-masters red-handed, demonstrating without doubt how industry-funded research is designed to avoid finding problems, and how adverse findings are distorted or denied.

 

Independent researches and reporting is attacked and suppressed

Scientists who discover problems with GMOs have been attacked, gagged, fired, threatened, and denied funding. The journal Nature acknowledged that a “large block of scientists . . . denigrate research by other legitimate scientists in a knee-jerk, partisan, emotional way that is not helpful in advancing knowledge.” Attempts by media to expose problems are also often censored.
GMOs harm the environment

GM crops and their associated herbicides can harm birds, insects, amphibians, marine ecosystems, and soil organisms. They reduce bio-diversity, pollute water resources, and are unsustainable. For example, GM crops are eliminating habitat for monarch butterflies, whose populations are down by 50% in the US. Roundup herbicide has been shown to cause birth defects in amphibians, embryonic deaths and endocrine disruptions, and organ damage in animals even at very low doses. GM canola has been found growing wild in North Dakota and California, threatening to pass on its herbicide tolerant genes on to weeds.

 

GMOs do not increase yields, and work against feeding a hungry world

Whereas sustainable non-GMO agricultural methods used in developing countries have conclusively resulted in yield increases of 79% and higher, GMOs do not, on average, increase yields at all. This was evident in the Union of Concerned Scientists’ 2009 report Failure to Yield, the definitive study to date on GM crops and yield.

 

The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD) report, authored by more than 400 scientists and backed by 58 governments, stated that GM crop yields were “highly variable” and in some cases, “yields declined.” The report noted, “Assessment of the technology lags behind its development, information is anecdotal and contradictory, and uncertainty about possible benefits and damage is unavoidable.” They determined that the current GMOs have nothing to offer the goals of reducing hunger and poverty, improving nutrition, health and rural livelihoods, and facilitating social and environmental sustainability.
By avoiding GMOs, you contribute to the coming tipping point of consumer rejection, forcing them out of our food supply Because GMOs give no consumer benefits, if even a small percentage of us start rejecting brands that contain them, GM ingredients will become a marketing liability. Food companies will kick them out. In Europe, for example, the tipping point was achieved in 1999, just after a high profile GM safety scandal hit the papers and alerted citizens to the potential dangers. In the US, a consumer rebellion against GM bovine growth hormone has also reached a tipping point, kicked the cow drug out of dairy products by Wal-Mart, Starbucks, Dannon, Yoplait, and most of America’s dairies and also in China.

 

Four Reasons Why Organic Farming is cheaper

Organic still remains the best and the cheapest. However, during training of some farmers in rural Ghana on adopting organic farming technology and after training the farmer saw the sustainability of the environment and opportunities to diversify agriculture. These were the views of some participants of the training and field trials. That organic farming/ technology requires no expensive synthetic fertilizers, no expensive pesticide and no expensive herbicide and lastly organic farms uses less water.

 

The Myth verses the Truth of Conventional & GMO against Organic technology

  • They do not increase crop yield.
  • They increase pesticide use.
  • They create superweeds.
  • They have toxic allergenic effects on laboratory animals.
  • They cannot co-exist with non- GM crops.
  • They are not needed for good nutrition.
  • There are better ways to feed the world.
  • Conventional breeding is better than GM at producing crops with useful traits.
  • They are unprecise technology that will continue to deliver unpleasant surprises.
  • They are not about feeding the world but it’s about patented ownership of food supply chains.

 

In conclusion: Do we eat to live? Or, we live to eat? Eat organic food and eat well “Not all mistakes are tolerable, a mistake from a pilot or a surgeon would cost lives, so is our environment”

 

KWASHIE DARKUDZI B. Sc Animal Health (Hon) is the Operations Director of Darsfield EarthCare & Farm-Tech Foundation an agriculture in environment civil society in Ghana. He is a trainer of rural farmers in organic farming fruits and vegetables, sustainable farming such as agro-forestry, snail, mushroom, beekeeping and captive rearing of animals, aquaculture and agro-processing initiatives.

Contact. dvfarms1970@yahoo.co.uk, darsfoundationgh@gmail.com.

 

THE AGONY OF GHANA’S AGRICULTURE

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INVESTORS WANTED

A reputable, integrated and profitable Organic farming company is looking for investors to invest in the company’s project,
• Pack-housing units
• Grocery malls (FoodMart)
• Agro-processing unit of fruit and vegetables
• Agro-loans to small-scale farmers and
• Small-scale agro financing (soft loans)

Interested investors should call +22208613398 or email darsfoundation@aol.com for further information. Visit www.darsfoundation.org

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SCHOOL FARM

Darsfoundation EarthCare & Farm-Tech Foundation (Darsfoundation) and Darsfield Village Farms (Darsfarm) is organizing a 3 day (once every month from Friday through Sunday) training in starting, implementing and managing a farming enterprise.
Also included in the training are-
• Starting a farm business
• Choosing a farm project
• Conducting market survey
• Farm project management
• Assessing and managing business risks
Training package includes snacks, feeding, on-field practical, certificate and a guide to writing up your business plan.

Further enquires contact 0208613398 & 0262613398 and darsfoundation@gmail.com. Visit www.darsfoundation.org for details

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ORGANIC FOOD FOR HEALTH, FOR YOU

Darsfoundation farmers are producing the followings-
• Organic fruits (pineapple, papaya, water melon and mango)
• Organic vegetables (turia, pepper, tomato, onion, mushroom and salad leaves),
• Essential and edible oil (shea butter, coconut oil, Baobab oil, palm oil, Moringa oil and Neem oil),
• Spices and herbs (Xylopia powder, ginger, garlic and Moringa) powder,
• Cassava products (crispy gari, tapioca, dough and starch),
• Black soaps (Alata samina, Allanblackia soap and natural ointments),
• Others products (Honey and snail).
Call us for your orders and we would deliver on schedule

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TRAINING IN INNOVATIVE AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY

Be trained in a day to a week seminar with on- field practical on the followings-
• Livestock farming (pigs and poultry)
• Grass-cutter and rabbitary rearing
This will includes farming methods, types of breeds, feed preparation & management, breeders management, disease control, marketing and financing. With emphasis on cost control and efficient productive plans.

• Aquaculture (Tilapia fish-cage or brackish water fishpond)
This will include fish farming methods, types of tilapia breeds, fish-cage & brackish water pond construction, hatcheries, nurseries, grow-out, disease control, marketing and financing.

• Sustainable farming (Snail, mushroom and beekeeping)
• Vermiculture (Worm farming)
• Organic fruits and vegetables farming
This includes making compost (rich soil for farming), manure tea, organic insecticides & pesticides, making nurseries, acquiring seeds, planting & transplanting, disease identification & control, harvesting, transporting, marketing and financing.

The course fee per program is Ghc 250/ person/ course
NB: You can be trained in one or more programs. To be trained in three or more programs you pay only Ghc 600/ person. The program training comes with training materials, on-field practical, Snacks, Lunch and Certificates.

We have special discount for groups, community, churches and associations of farmers.

Venue for the training: Darsfoundation Office Nsawam or Council hall, Nsawam.

Time: 9 AM prompt. Nsawam Monday through Saturday

Call Darsfoundation on 0208613398/ 0262613398 to register now

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AFRICA BUSINESS ELITES

Africa business elites have the primary responsibility for implementing this developmental agenda, we believe that if the Africa business class shows the way, government and investors will follow. Philanthropist can be used to provide grants and subsidies that reduce costs and risks for new business. It can provide the free money to business to support their growth as well as co-invest with financial institution to provide guarantees and incentives.

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THE NEW DAWN FOR AFRICA

Darsfoundation marries philanthropy with business. It is a call- to- action for Africans to take primary responsibility for our development and for non- Africans to evolve their thinking about how best to channel their efforts and investment in the region.

Every challenge facing Africa today, from healthcare to education, to food security and even national security and social stability. The more opportunity the private sectors can provide, the more Africa will benefit from a stable and productive economic environment as well as self-reliance in solving persistent socio- economic issues.

For Africa’s well publicized growth over the last decade has been in extractive and export- led, which has relatively little impact in job creations and domestic wealth. Given current trends, tens of millions of people will enter the workforce over the next decade but we are not creating private jobs fast enough. We need robust platform of private sector job growth and wealth creation in Africa.

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TRAINING! TRAINING!! TRAINING!!!

TRAINING! TRAINING!! TRAINING!!!

Be trained in a day to a week seminar and with on- field practical on the following programs-
• Livestock farming (pigs and poultry)
• Grass-cutter and rabbitary rearing
This will includes farming methods, types of breeds, feed preparation & management, structures, breeders management, disease control, marketing and financing. With emphasis on cost control and efficient productive plans.

• Aquaculture (Tilapia fish-cage or brackish water fishpond)
This will include fish farming methods, types of tilapia breeds, fish-cage & brackish water pond construction, hatcheries, nurseries, grow-out, disease control, marketing and financing.

• Sustainable farming (Snail, mushroom and beekeeping)
• Vermiculture (Worm farming)
• Organic fruits and vegetables farming
This includes making compost (rich soil for farming), manure tea, organic insecticides & pesticides, making nurseries, acquiring seeds, planting & transplanting, disease identification & control, harvesting, transporting, marketing and financing.

The course fee per program is Ghc 250/ course
NB: You can be trained in one or more programs. To be trained in three or more programs you pay only Ghc 600. The program training comes with training materials, on-field practical, Snacks, Lunch and Certificates.

We have special discount for groups, community, churches and associations of farmers.

Venue for the training: Darsfoundation Office Nsawam or Council hall, Nsawam.

Time: 9 AM prompt. Nsawam Monday through Saturday

Call Darsfoundation on 0208613398/ 0262613398 to register now

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